web analytics

2019 Ginseng Prices

This is the 2019 Ginseng Prices page. It’s a place for diggers and buyers to make contacts and leave tips for each other. If you want to leave a comment for diggers or buyers, or have questions you want to ask from the folks in this field, feel free to use the comment section as your forum. All I ask is that you be respectful in your disagreements if you have any.

If you’d like to place an add to buy or sell anything ginseng related, see below for information about how to do that. Comments are entirely free always. The classifieds just give you the opportunity to post pics with it.


ginseng classifieds

ginseng seedling in spring

This space is available if you have roots you want to show pics of and offer for sale to buyers, or anything else related to ginseng that you want to advertise. I’m all out of seedlings for bare-root shipping this fall, or I’d have a little ad posted here. You can have 3 photos and 50 words of text for $10. Click here to buy your listing.


Help with Identification

If you’re new to digging, you might want to double check the identity of the plants you’re planning to dig. I can’t tell you how many folks thought they had ‘tons’ of ginseng only to find out what they had was ‘tons’ of Virginia creeper.

Just so you know, I’m not a digger or a seller. I do sell ginseng and goldenseal seedlings to the local market in spring and bare root by mail order in fall.

Wild Ozark is the only certified ginseng nursery in Arkansas. Mostly, though, my interest in ginseng is in sharing the love I have for the fragile habitat these plants love to live in, in helping others be good stewards, and in offering information to those interested in re-establishing or identifying good habitat.

Previous Prices Pages

Leave a comment if you’re looking for a buyer/dealer, or have info on prices in your neck of the woods. Buyers, leave info on how to get in touch with you and a general location. If you’re a seasoned digger, share some wisdom with the newbies for how to keep this plant going for generations still to come:

164 thoughts on “2019 Ginseng Prices”

  1. I hope the price for gensing is good this year, I have been out hiking everyday for last month and have found a ton of big 4prongs. I think all the rain we got in early summer may have helped the seng this year. Boomer,W.V.

  2. I live in Kent Ohio by the campus the rain did wonders for the plants here I don’t harvest I just love to watch them grow that and Golden seal good luck with the sang season

    1. I don’t harvest either, just observe and enjoy the habitats. Mostly all I’ve done this year is smash rocks and make paint, though, lol. We’ve had a lot of rain, too. Yesterday I went out to see if the berries had gotten ripe yet, and they did and have begun to drop. Deer ate quite a few tops, but left the berry stalks, so no big problem. The goldenseal seemed to do much better here this year than the ginseng. They enjoyed the rain more, I guess. Good luck to all who are digging, and be good stewards!

  3. Shawn showalter

    Last year in pa I know guys getting 700.00 a pound freshly dug and 1200.00 a pound dry I’m hoping its the same this year , I havent sold I. 3 years I’ve been transplanting all of it this will be my first year digging again since 16

  4. I live in upstate NY , and new to all this , am inquiring for a friend who has some green ginseng — I’m looking to get current prices for my area as well as a possible buyer , can you help

    1. Hi, as far as I know, it’s not legal anywhere to have green ginseng right now. Season opens Sept. 1 here and everywhere else I know of. Your friend might ought to go plant that green ginseng back where he got it. If by some chance there is an earlier season for you, try searching for the plant board in your state. Usually each state has a list of buyers with contact info.

  5. To the guy from Pa. that’s totally bs. Never happened. You’ve watched too much Appalachian outlaws.
    The market is shaky this year. Trade wars and protestors in HK will have a huge affect on prices. My best advice. Sell fresh and sell fast.

  6. Madison, the tariffs matter but the mess in Hong Kong is the big deal right now. The large majority of dried ginseng goes to HK for grading and distributing. I advise everyone to sell fresh or dry your roots and sell before December. Good luck to my digger and dealer friends.

  7. Hello everyone, I’m Kali .
    So I’ve just came across this Ginseng harvesting Idea yesterday ! It was brought to my attention And I’ve been researching ever sense, I want to become a harvester but I’ve never even planted a flower and I don’t have the slightest idea where to begin . so hopefully you guys can help me make this journey a little easier and tell me step-by-step the things I need to do ! thank you so very much

    1. Hi Kali, you’ve got a lot to learn, lol. Ginseng is a plant with very specific growing requirements and some important legal rules about harvesting and selling. If you’re interested in wild-simulated or woods grown, I have a lot of information here on my website. A good starting point is this page: https://www.wildozark.com/ginseng-articles-and-headlines/ but I have no experience at all with growing it as a cultivated crop under shade or hoops.

      Depending on where you live, it may or may not be possible for you. If you have questions during your journey, feel free to ask. Also, if you’ve become interested because you think it’s a great way to make some quick money, you’ll be disappointed quick.

  8. Pasted over from the 2018 page.
    Author: Dan Derosia
    Comment:
    Hi! I am a newbie and have done some research. I live in upstate SC. I have some companion plants with the right hardwoods and just about ideal shade amounts. The soil tests show a slightly lower ph than ideal. My question is do you know if where ground cedar grows, would that compliment my ginseng growing? I plan to grow wild-simulated scattered on my 8 acres… thanks for any advice!

    Hi Dan, I have ginseng growing under eastern red cedars and they’re surviving, but they aren’t doing as well as the ones in the deep loamy woods with no cedars. Also Bob Beyfuss (http://www.ginsenggeek.org/bob-beyfuss/) talks about pH and calcium levels in one of his books. Low pH and high calcium are actually desireable, depending on how low you mean when you say ‘low’. Average pH here is under 5 and over 4.

  9. Milton D Overcash

    Hello, I am selling the root and looking for some buyers. Have not dug any up but inquiring about who may want to buy from me.

    1. Hi Milton, it’s a GREAT idea to find a buyer before you bother digging. What state are you located in? Someone out there in your area might see this and reach out to you. If I know buyers in your area, I can ask them to contact you. No specifics needed but a general area is helpful.

    1. No one has confirmed those prices, yet. I know TNA Ginseng often advertises really high prices, but they pick only the very best roots to pay at that rate. But that hasn’t been confirmed either, just rumor.

      1. I will confirm that. I had an Ozark digger a couple of years ago who thought he would get his ginseng certified and sell to them via mail. He sent them pictures of what he had to offer. They would not come close to their advertised prices. If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is.

    1. Hi Doug, welcome to the 2019 Ginseng Prices page. We’d love to hear news whenever you have it, regarding opening prices, etc. or anything else that might interest those interested in ginseng. Feel free to comment on other comments seeking help or information, too.

  10. Last year in Wv I got 658 a pound dry at the end of the season when prices are usually better , I hope its close to that or better this year

  11. Well i just got off the phone with our local buyer. He said the only info he had at the moment was wet seng will start at $10 a ounce so $160lb and he wouldnt have dry prices til around. Sept 10th. Boomer Wv.

  12. Kristen Allgood

    Hi y’all! I’m glad I came across this feed. I’m a newbie to all of this, but have been doing my research for a while now. We decided this year beings we have spotted several healthy plants on our property that we would jump in on the fun. I do have a couple of questions for y’all.
    1. What is your best advice as far as digging them up? What to use.
    2. Do you remove the plant from the root before selling or leave it whole?
    3. Is it best to sell fresh & wet roots or let them dry first?
    4. And what is the best way to go about locating a buyer? I’m located in central Illinois.

    Thank you in advance for any tips & advice!

    1. Hi Kristin, I’ll answer your questions with my opinions, and I hope some of the others who pass through here offer theirs too, because mine and theirs may not be the same, lol.
      1. If you only have several plants, don’t dig any of them. If you have 100’s of plants, then carefully choose which of those to dig. Don’t dig all of the older plants- leave a good portion of those to continue reproducing. Only dig some of the various ages over 10 years that you have. Also, if you haven’t already had someone verify the identity of your plants, either send a pic or have someone who knows ginseng come out and make sure it’s ginseng.
      2. Different states have different laws about whether to leave stem attached or not. You’ll have to check with the Plant Board in Illinois to be sure how your state handles it, or contact a buyer to ask.
      3. Fresh is less hassle but they pay less per pound.
      4. Your state should have a list of buyers and contact information. Here in Arkansas, it’s the State Plant Board. In your state it might be Wildlife and Fisheries. I believe WildGrown.com has a list of buyers for each state.

      Good luck, and be a good ginseng steward so you have roots to dig and your grandchildren will too!

      1. Thank you so much Madison!! I will get in touch with IL DNR to ensure I’ve got all of my ducks in a row, lol Happy hunting!!

      2. Interesting site. I’m not exactly a newbie, but not an expert either. I currently have about 2 acres under shade ( cultivated ). Going to be 3 years before I dig, but I have been spending some time in the Wausau Wisconsin area researching, getting to know the people, buying equipment and gaining knowledge. One thing I’m seeing ( or actually NOT seeing ) is a lack of comments on cleaning and drying ginseng. About the only thing the experienced growers agree on is the importance of drying properly. They say it is almost an art form, and the Asian buyers can spot improperly dried ginseng a mile away, just a couple roots showing signs of rings or mildew will severely lower the price of ALL. The ginseng in that batch. Personally for what I am doing( an acre per year ) I am not going to attempt it. There are several knowledgeable guys in the Wausau area that do custom drying pretty reasonable.I see most of these posts are wild and likely small quantities, but drying is all important regardless of whether it is wild or cultivated. For small quantities and limited experience selling green may be the way to go

        1. Great comment, Dan, thank you. Yes, the drying is incredibly important and I’ve read a few different ways some of the old-timer’s do it. I’ve personally seen some that was dried poorly and some that was dried correctly. The poor ones were dry, but spongy in texture inside, though not moldy. The quality ones were very solid and almost as dense as a rock when I broke it. It was so hard I could hardly break it by hand and had to ‘chop’ it with a cleaver. Huge difference in how it looked and felt. I’d love to see some comments on how everyone else in this forum does it. If anyone wants to contribute information on that, I’ll make a blog post or page about it. Everyone who tells me their process will be added to the post with credits and a link if you have something you want me to link to. It’s a knowledge worth gathering, for sure.

          1. Thanks Madison, I have dried a few roots myself and done well. It seems the more I learn, the less I know. Using heat in the right amounts to dry is important, but getting rid of the moisture and humidity to prevent mold or mildew in larger quantities where roots touch especially ,is important . As I said, I don’t think I’m going to dry my own. There are reputable guys that custom dry reasonable, of course I am talking cultivated with a much larger quantity than wild.

    2. Kristen, I may be leading with the chin, but I’ve talked to a couple of the Illinois buyers, and frankly wasn’t much impressed. There are not to many people really into ginseng in Central Illinois, outside of a few by the river around Peoria. I do know one guy that has grown ginseng for many years and he certifies and sells out of state. Illinois only recognizes 2 forms of ginseng, wild, which must be a minimum of 10 years old or cultivated. I posted earlier that drying is all important. Roots touching or being dried to fast or to slow can have a huge affect on what ginseng is worth. Do your homework if our plan on drying your own.

    1. Hey Terry, just testing to see if you can get a reply to your comment…if so, maybe it’ll let you reply to this comment. And if that works, I’ll have more clues to finding out what’s wrong.

  13. Hello my name Kevin , I live in the North part of NC next to the Virginia boarder , and I’ve being doing some research on some buyer’s for gensang and I have not found any that wasn’t about a 3 or 4 he drive , is there anyone on here that maybe point me in the right direction for finding someone that isn’t that far away . Thanks

    1. Hi Kevin- you could always do as Terry Manley suggested and get it certified then mail it out. But I’m not sure how far away you’d have to travel to get it certified, or whether the certifiers will go to you.

  14. Stacy Marie Halmich

    I am selling ginsing this year, in missouri, however. I have been having a frustrating time locating a buyer. Anyone who could send one my way would be truly appreciated.

  15. I live in Missouri and ha e Wild Ginseng on my property that I would harvest if I could find a buyer in advance..Also how does one go about getting it certified ect…

  16. Could anyone please tell me in a ( ballpark figure) what a ginseng man root I found last season would possibly be worth? I’m new to the hunting and selling of ginseng. The root I found is 6.5 grams dry. It stands from top to bottom 18 inches and from side to side 11.5 inches. I am almost certain it is a once in a lifetime find for not only me but, even the most seasoned hunters. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

      1. I’m sorry it has taken me so long to get back with you. I have not had the root certified by yet but, i have counted the rings twice and i came up with 25 the first time and the second time around i counted 27 rings. Since i posted the first question i have found 2 more man roots but, they are much smaller. One is approx. 10 and the other 13 yrs old. If you or anyone else could give me a just some sort of price what all three would be worth, I would really appreciate it. Thanks!

  17. I live in southern Missouri I have harvested ginseng for 40 years good roots are well dug and old and they will bring top dollar even in Missouri I am tired of hearing that our ginseng in poor quality the buyers pick the top roots and sell them on the east coast and the poor quality broken ect. Gets to be Ozarks roots as buyers see our roots as we dig them they like the product so check several buyers to get a solid price.

    1. Thanks for dropping in some advice, Steve. I’d love to see the Ozarks root get more respect, too. What I think is the reason for the ‘lesser quality’ judgement is the ginsenosides content when analyzed and compared to Appalachian root. I don’t have any assays on hand so can’t say whether it is lower or not, as compared to whatever other locations. But I’m curious to know how a buyer could tell from looking at a root if it’s Ozark or Appalachian, or if it’s just assumed that all root from the Ozarks is going to rank lower on the assays. If it’s not true, that would be a good perception to correct.

  18. Donnie Daugherty

    My name is Donnie Daugherty im from TN and I’m tired of hearing people and dealers an buyers of ginseng all over the USA telling everybody that dry sang is gonna be hard to sell or to get rid of but the fresh green sang is the way to go if your wanting to sell that’s because they want to pay u less for your ginseng and dry it themselves and sell it for top dollar to the highest bidder at the east coast and they know that and no one is sitting on thousands of pounds of dry American sang because it’s illegal to possess in the USA after December the 31st that’s the end of the season in the US and it does matter about the size of ginseng because the Chinese pay the most for that but if u have 5 or 10,000 pounds of wild American ginseng they r not gonna sort through it and pick out the big ones they want it all and the buyers here in the US knows that so don’t let them tell you any crap u can take ur sang to the east coast yourself but diggers r not suppose to take their sang across state lines cause they have made it illegal to do so unless u have a license to transport ginseng and u can even get your license to buy sell trade and transport ginseng just like they have done the Chinese want any and all wild American ginseng because it’s the most potent ginseng in the world and that’s y they buy it by the tons at an auction and it goes to the highest bidder just something every digger should know and think about and remember and pass down to our kids

  19. It sure what’s up but I’m unable to reply directly to a comment. Madison and I are working on it
    I would like to say to Donnie D. that your resent post is bs. You are slamming buyers and biting the hand that feeds you. As a digger/seller you CANNOT just go get a license and as you put it, bypass legitimate licensed dealers. But you can get a buyers license. Then, unless you are wealthy you cann go to the bank and borrow a couple hundre thou. The bank will want an attachment to your home or farm. I think you know where I’m coming from.
    Trust me, as a dealer for decades we work much cheaper than you think and much harder than you think. Rethink your position and thank the next guy that buys your roots.

    1. Testing comments… Terry I can’t use my phone to leave a comment at someone else’s blog, so I think the issue is WordPress itself. I also can’t ‘reply ‘ to a comment here but have to start a new one. But that’s more clues than I had before so I have something to investigate now.

  20. Madison,

    Thanks for hosting this discussion. Regardless of pricing it appears the season will be short this year. My observation are berries are heavy but going dormant early. Lots of yellow and larger stalks already falling over. I appreciate the comments on price and I believe wild ginseng prices will go higher towards season end as usual. The mystery is part of the excitement of Ginseng trade. Thanks Again

  21. I still can’t give a direct reply but I agree with the post today from Richard Bishop. I cut a very wide path in my ginseng buying routes and I’m hearing it every day. Plants are dying. Berries are gone. I think that will help prices but mostly it will help the future of ginseng. Please dig a little. Leave a lot.

    1. I don’t know what’s wrong with the reply button for you, but I’m glad you can at least comment now. All the berries have dropped here too, and some of the plants are beginning to yellow.

  22. If only everyone could take a year off from digging and just try and help repopulate by planting seeds and in some cases, resetting smaller plants to spread them out.
    I have made it a point to spread seed in every patch of woods that I can find around Chattanooga. I have found certain areas that have ginseng but would like to see it make a come back and be everwhere in the north facing hills!
    #wildrootwanderer
    #livetodig

    1. Hi David, thanks for your stewardship! It’s unlikely everyone will take a year off in the same year, but I know here there are a lot less diggers than before, so maybe it’ll make a good comeback. It would be nice for me to get a pic from someone who is looking for an id on a ‘huge patch they found’ and it turn out to really be ginseng and not Virginia creeper, lol. It’s almost never ginseng if they found a huge patch, even though it did grow that way once.

      1. Madison
        I can assure you what i find in patches is NOT virginia creeper. Just good old fashioned Ginseng, in patches. I do have some marvelous patch pics to prove it.
        My honey holes in Ky.

  23. Two weeks into the season and I am hearing reports from everywhere that ginseng is dying off fast. I don’t believe that’s the case here in northern Indiana but I sure it’s true in many areas. Prices are inching up. Fresh prices are all over the place. Here in Indiana $120 to $160 and higher for select roots. I heard a report of a dealer selling fresh in West Virginia for $200. Dry offers are also climbing. I think average root is at $500 and select quality could be as high as $600. All this is due to the assumption that root is going to be short this season. I believe it! I don like to post prices because I see the root and then name a price. My diggers and dealers come back every season. I will tell you that my prices are definitely in the rages stated above and higher in many cases. My best advice-don’t look a gift horse in the mouth. Good luck and be safe. Terry

    1. Thanks for the update Terry. I was just out in the patches yesterday getting an order of seedlings together and found one of the older plants still with a few berries attached. But most are dropped and most of the plants are starting to yellow.

    2. Here in southern wv most of its burnt up and nothing but berry pods no stalks or leaves you for sure gotta look down this way the no rain has bout got it…but good thing I guess prices will be high for dry I hope

  24. Man you don’t know what you’re talking about when you say biting the hand that feeds you if it was not for the people who dig the ginseng you people would not have it.. and and you guys are not the true back of the ginseng system the diggers and the people who plant and replenish the land 4 digger and most areas mountains like here in Tennessee people don’t go back through and plant ginseng for us to dig for Harvest we bring the Wild America ginseng to the market the diggers you would have nothing if we didn’t bring it out of the hills we feed your hands so the next time you want to buy or buy a man’s sang u should thank him for selling it to you and I’ve been digging sang All My Life as well as my father and his father before him and I dealt with Byers all over the state and all of you say the same thing all of you about the quality of the sang and the size and the age and how well it was don and manicured and dried and stored but I tell you what when we have it in front of you you will not let it leave u would have something negative to say about any man’s roots that he brings to you even if it was just to say that he didn’t have more of of it and tell him that was poor quality or it’s real small or he didn’t cure it manicure it well are you going to give him a low price but will not let him leave with it. And as far as license you can get them anywhere look online they sell them all the time any one of you people can look it up for yourselves to get a license to start buying and selling and trading ginseng legally and yeah I am trashing buyers of ginseng because all of the buyers think the diggers should thank you for buying their sang wrong you should thank them for bringing it to you and not to someone else all of you are the same you’re out to help your pocket with our hand Back Time and our ginseng and as far as the fresh green selling season I remember that you couldn’t even sell it green they wanted to it dry they wanted it very clean no dirt and very dry so this buying green ginseng started buy local Byers figured out how to make a profit are paying cheaper money for it and drying it themselves for a better profit and i also remember my grandfather my father our whole family diggin sang and drying it all season long and selling it at the end of season any where from 800 to 1200 dollars per pound 25 to 30 years ago and that’s how my family was able to buy shoes and clothes for the family and everything else we needed and our family depended on it year after year we sold yellow root blood root lady slipper and a lot more in the harvest seasons to servive if every digger in this country would stop diggin for 1 whole season and not sell then the next season’s prices would be outrageous to most diggers today before the season ever came close to opening day if every digger refused to dig an sell sang then where whould you be for that season and as far as selling off everything you own or getting a huge loan from the bank or hocking your land to get started for your license then sir your either fos or just a liar because a man that i used to sell to who is dead now God rest his soul the state of TN gave him a Grant every year to perches ginseng an he actually wrote you a receipt for your sang in a big black binder an you had to give your id tell what County you got it your address and you had to sign it as well and i will tell you his name but i don’t think i need to so buyers don’t bite the hands that feed you

  25. My name is Travis Moles. I been digging and trying to grow sang for about 15 yrs. Now. The reason i started planting it is because i think of ppl keep digging it early like they do there wont b amy wild root left to dig. I want my kids and grand kids to know what ginse g is and how important it is. Alot of ppl think itz a get rich quick deal. And thats not true. The tv shows that are on the history channel has got everyone digging it and thinking its gonna make them rich.lol. as far as a short season i beloeve it will b to. Its been to dry. Heck a month ago thr leaves were turning yell0w and tje seeds were still green. And by the way i live in tennesse and have all my life. Most of kixs now days probably couldn’t idenify sang if they were standing in a patch. Thats why its important to me to teach my boys everything i can about it. But anyways good luck to all the diggers out there and to the buyers as well

    1. Hi Travis, glad to have you on site. I do love knowing my kids and grandkids all know what ginseng is and how to be good stewards. Thanks for the update and words from your part of the ginseng world 🙂

  26. Sit on your dry seng! Seng is drying up already for a short season. Buyers know this and say sell fast and sell fresh for their profit. Prices will be great for dry seng late in the season…

  27. I live around Sistersville WV. Found many yellow plants first of digging season. It’s gonna be a very short season up this way as well.

  28. We are in north east wva here the berries have dropped. alot ate still green but no rain is drying it fast my wife and i are blessed to have large patches leaving alot to seed next year we did however dig some for a few bills we wish everyone a save and blessed season

    1. iam from southern wv what kind of dry prices have you heard of? I have close to 5 dry just wondering if I should hold out for better in November?

  29. Thanks Benjamin for you comment today. I have customers in centralWV that tell me it’s almost gone.
    Nice to see a digger comment without bashing root dealers.

    1. I think people tend to stereotype when they feel they’ve been unfairly treated. Folks, Terry is one of the good guys. Trevor Mills is the other dealer I know and he’s one of the good guys. I can’t vouch for everyone out there because I don’t know them all, but these two I know. I think in general, most dealers are honest and most diggers are too, but I am admittedly an optimist. I’m sure dealers have some burnt dealings with diggers too, just like every other industry out there, the possibility for dishonesty exists on both ends of the dealings. Dealers need diggers and diggers need dealers (maybe not always in every case, but in general), and I need all of y’all for insights on the ginseng industry from the ground to the consumers 🙂

  30. North Mississippi here. Been very dry and hot for the last month or longer and most of the plants I’m finding are yellow-green,some with berries still on but mostly not. Can anyone recommend a buyer in my area? Thanks enjoy your page.

    1. Thanks for the update from MS. I have not heard any buyers from MS check in here before, but hopefully someone will get in touch. I hadn’t even heard of MS being a ginseng producing state, so I hope your state even has buyers. Have you ever sold it before?

  31. LOOKING FOR A BUYER FOR SOME BIG ROOTS! 8″+ DRYING NOW. SEVERAL WEIGHED OVER 3 OZS GREEN. THESE ARE FROM 1987 – 1994. MANY OF THE PLANTS ONLY JUST STARTED TURNING YELLOW, BUT MANY MORE ALREADY WERE GONE AND ALL THE BERRY’S HAVE FALLEN OFF, IN CALHOUN COUNTY IL. SAW A GUY ON EBAY WANTING OVER $5,000 FOR 3 SMALLER ROOTS. DAMN DEER WON’T GET TO EAT THE LEAVES NEXT YEAR!

  32. Thanks Madison for your comment on 9/22. My reputation as a buyer is very good. I work hard to keep it that way. I made a good living years ago. I work today to support our way of life. That post from DD a few days ago just burned my butt. I’m over it.

  33. This isDD and I’m glad you’re over it cuz you no wat we as diggers r to I’m just telling the damn truth and y’all no it u wouldn’t b n the market if u wasn’t making money at it and people y u think u haven’t heard any dry prices yet think about it

  34. Hey I m a first year digger. I m from east TN. Found about 2 and 1/2lbs. As of right now. Dont know who to sell to. Also just heard a rumor from an old time digger. Says dry is sadly low this year 100lb. Rediculous! At that price I ll just hold on To it.

    1. Thanks for the TN update Derrick. I’ve heard it’s low in other places too. But that’s the lowest yet. Except one buyer isn’t even buying dry at all so I guess 0 is even lower. Might get better before season ends.

    2. Derrick, a good buyer in East Tennessee is Darrell McGhee in Clinton,Tn. You can contact him at 865-457-2225.

  35. For all those that are new to digging and “selling” ginseng, here’s a few considerations I adhere to before “giving” it away. Never get in a hurry to sell. Be very wary of buyers that post on forums and say that because of one reason or another prices will stay low this year. “But I’ll do you a favor and take it off your hands”. Never ever trust character recommendations. And never trust what people say on forums.
    The people you want to talk to about buying your ginseng won’t have the time to negotiate a “deal” in a forum. Each state regulates ginseng differently. And I can absolutely dig my roots before September 1, if I choose. In my state I am adhering to the law.
    To get the most for your roots do a little research from the agency that regulates it in your state. Most of those agency’s ,(at least my state does)
    have a list of licensed dealers. Go through the list, look for dealers in major city’s. Look for dealers with foreign sounding names. These are the top tier dealers. The ones buying from the low tier buyers. They also make trips through the state at various times. Call them up, send them a couple pictures and they’ll come to you. The more middle men you eliminate , the more money you’ll get.

  36. Hey Derrick my name is Donnie Daugherty and I live n e TN and there’s a man here n Anderson county given $30.00 an oz right now for dry and will pay $20.00 more per pound that anyone else is giving so don’t let most of the buyers tell u any b.s. man

  37. So now I see that one digger that has pretty much declared all buyers crooks is bragging about a local buyer doing him a great big favor paying $30 an ounce for dry ginseng. Well I don’t know this digger or his buyer and I don’t want to use this forum to argue with anyone and I will not comment on this issue again but I want to say this.
    If you are selling east Tn root for $30 an ounce you are not getting fair value. The harvest is short. The demand for fresh root is good. $480 a lb is way short of market price for that section root. I pay a lot more than that for Indiana/Ohio root.

  38. U haven’t even said a price yet as far as I no and ur the 1 whole said dry sang would b n short demand because of the short season. But fresh green sang is the way to go this season. And give a price. Instead of saying u will give a lot more for it and my buyer will pay $20.00 more then any buyer per pound

  39. We cant down talk the buyers we as diggers are trying to make extra money as the buyers are doing also our buyer Doves fur works well with local diggers but as diggers want top dallors and the markets are not there then buyers have to make theirs also we can dig it but if the market is not there then the buyers can only do what they can as for my wife and i we make the differance with outher roots a little here and there adds up sorry for any hard feelings i may bring up but i feel we should support everyone diggers and buyers

  40. I have some wild duper dried gensing, at least > 1 pound that my father dug up on our tennessee farm over 20 years ago. He died in 1996. I forgot I had it until the house had some damage and I found on top of an old refrigerator in a bag. I poured to contents into a box and it was definitely > 1 pound. Can someone tell me where I might find what it is worth and if I can find a buyer???? Thanks, Wanda

  41. Looking for 2019 ginseng prices in WV first year digger actually stumbled into some genseng and decided to pick a few patches. Just looking for some help

  42. I live n south east To. I have close to a pound of dried gjnsang & looking for a buyer. If yall could send me some phone numbers, it would be greatly appreciated. Thanx

  43. SO WHAT’S THE PRICE GOING FOR? I DUG A PATCH THAT WAS GROWING SINCE 1987.
    BIG STUFF! DAMN DEER WON’T EAT NEXT YEAR!

  44. I’m interested in the price of wild ginseng in Arkansas also I’ve got quite a collection of bar wood lumber and old cedar posts and hand hewn trees plus full stumps with the driftwood look perfect for land scaping

    1. Hi Donald, Mills Ginseng was buying but only fresh last time I talked to him. Not sure of prices right now, though. His email is . For dried you might try schofield’s but I don’t have his contact info. Maybe someone reading this will leave that. Hope you get some interest for your wood items too 😊

  45. Also the man said to hold on to the sang he was told it will jump up about double because of the very short dry season.

  46. Curiosity about Ginseng prices brought me to this page and I have not seen the first information about current prices for Ginseng. In Alabama where my friend says it is thick and abundant but he has never picked it because he had no idea it was worth anything.. I think I am getting Ginseng fever but am to old to bend over and dig anything anymore. Thank you for letting me post these comments.

    1. The prices vary from state to state. Here in AR it’s pretty low but I don’t know the current ones. If you post your state there might be someone out there who will let you know what it’s going for in your area. Thanks for dropping by 😁

  47. Ms. Cleadth, depending on where you are it might be best to leave it. But the first thing I’d do is verify that it is indeed ginseng and determine if you have enough to dig any and still maintain a colony. I’ll let the real diggers reply about the how to.

  48. 550 a lb here in Casy Co Ky.
    I always hold mine until March seems to bring more. Thanks for letting me share this good luck

  49. Do you have roots for sale to plant? I recently purchased forty acres of woods that I think would be good to grow ginseng. It’s got lots of ferns and damp, but well drained soil.

    1. Hi Jill, I’m sold out of plants. They usually sell out in August, but I never have very many to begin with. Next year I plan to have more for fall transplanting. If you’re local you could pick them up for spring but I don’t ship until October.

    1. We live near Kingston, AR. That would be great if you can come out in spring. I usually have them potted and ready to go my early to mid-May. For large orders, drop me a note by early April so I’ll know how many to pot up for you.

  50. If you are in or near NW Illinois I am buying a few pounds this year. Will offer $500/lb for good quality 10 year+

  51. I have roughly 5 large handfuls of dry, mature ginseng for sell. I don’t have to sell and may hold until the prices increase. Thomas

    1. I’m not sure anyone in AR is buying dried but I forwarded your message to Mills Ginseng just in case he is. But even if he is, he’s not likely to go that far south to do any buying. The only other AR buyer I know of was Newt in Harrison, but I don’t think he’s buying at all this year. There may be buyers in other states you could ship to, but you’d have to get it certified to do so. Paul Shell was the contact for doing that at the AR State Plant Board, but I’m not sure he’s still working there. I’ll know more about that next week when I get my nursery certified for the yearly renewal.

  52. Anyone looking for a good price on their dry ginseng please contact me. Ginseng from any state other than Indiana and Ohio must be certified. Also I have stratified seed for sale. $100 lb. my contact info can be found elsewhere on this forum. Terry Manley.

  53. Roger Johnson , I am from north Webster. I am among the largest root buyers in Indiana. My contact inf is on the Indiana DNR website.

  54. Nathanael Hughes

    Now that elections in Hong Kong have given the pro democracy protests a when, does anyone think this will effect the price of ginseng?

  55. Anyone know what the price is for dried ginseng per pound and ounce in Tennesse? I’m located in the middle of Crossville and Knoxville, (Roane County). We will travel to sale what we have. Feel free to email me at
    Thank You.

    PS. I talked to a Gentleman yesterday and he said he pays $700 per pound in Knoxville TN. Just seeing if anyone knows of any other buyers who pays more or is $700 a good deal?

  56. Hello, just had our regular buyer tell us he filled his quota for the year and is no longer buying ginseng. Looking for Midwest buyers for dry root. Any buyers in Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota?

    1. I don’t have any information on ginseng from that area. I’m not sure if OK has a certification body for ginseng, though. If not, it would be illegal to transport it across state lines because you wouldn’t be able to get it certified. Hopefully someone reading these comments will have some insight.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top